September 16, 2019  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

The Ecology of the Heath, Sep 24
Event - Posted - Tuesday, September 17, 2019 

Naturalist Fred Cichocki will describe the ecology of the 12-acre heath at Cathance Rive Nature Preserve in Topsham and other sphagnum moss wetlands. At Topsham Public Library, September 24, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
LUPC to Hold Public Meeting on Approved Fish River Lakes Concept Plan, Sep 25
Event - Posted - Tuesday, September 17, 2019 

The Maine Land Use Planning Commission staff will hold an open house and public meeting regarding the Fish River Chain of Lakes Concept Plan. At Caribou Inn and Convention Center, September 25, Open House 6 pm; Public Meeting 6:30 pm.
Maine Environmental News
Action Alert - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links to conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond; hey, we're all connected). We have posted summaries and links to 60,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Oppose CMP's transmission corridor
Action Alert - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Ask Maine’s Congressional delegation to urge the Army Corps for an Environmental Impact Statement and public hearing on Central Maine Power’s proposal for a transmission corridor through Western Maine. ~ Nick Bennett, NRCM
No logging in the Tongass National Forest
Action Alert - Monday, September 16, 2019 

The Amazon is burning, yet Donald Trump wants to open the world's largest intact temperate forest to mining and logging exploitation. He is opening 10 million acres in the Tongass National Forest to brutal exploitation. Tongass retains more carbon than any forest in the U.S., provides habitat for iconic wild creatures and contains old-growth trees as much as 1,000 years old. Don't let Trump destroy it. ~ CREDO Action
York Beach Clean Up, Sep 23
Event - Posted - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Join a beach clean up & attempt to set a world record spelling the largest "NO PLANET B" ever in the sand. The goal is 500 people At Long Sands Beach, York, September 23, 9 am - 12:30 pm.
Guided Canoe Trip with Ryan Linehan, Sep 22
Event - Posted - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

Delve into themes of industry, waterways, and the environment, with conversation in art galleries and on the Messalonskee River. At Colby Colby Museum of Art, Waterville, September 22, 12-4 pm, pre-registration required.
Tumbledown trail maintenance, guided hike scheduled, Sep 22
Event - Posted - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

A 4.7 mile round-trip guided hike up Tumbledown Mountain will include discussion of geology, trees and plants, history, wildlife and issues facing the mountain. Meet at Brook Trailhead on Byron Road, Weld, September 22, 9 am - 2 pm.
Portland Electric Car Ride & Drive, Sep 21
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 14, 2019 

Learn about electric cars during the 5th annual EV Expo. At Back Cove parking area off Preble Street, Portland, September 21, 12-4 pm, free pizza & coffee. Hosted by Natural Resources Council of Maine and ReVision Energy.
Smithsonian Museum Day, Sep 21
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 14, 2019 

An annual celebration of boundless curiosity hosted by Smithsonian magazine. At L.C. Bates Museum, Hinckley, September 21, 10 am - 4:30 pm.
Common Ground Country Fair, Sep 20-22
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 14, 2019 

More than 750 varied events at this annual celebration of rural living with a mix of workshops, demonstrations, music, vendors, farmers’ markets, fantastic food and more. At Unity, September 20-22, gates open daily at 9 am.
Life Happens Outside Festival, Sep 20-21
Event - Posted - Saturday, September 14, 2019 

At L.L. Bean Discovery Park, Freeport, September 20, 6:30 pm, food trucks; 7:15 pm, Maine Outdoor Film Festival. September 21, 10 am - 4 pm, climbing, biking, talks, exhibits. Free but donations benefit Teens To Trails.
Climate Strike, Sep 20-27
Action Alert - Friday, September 13, 2019 

It’s time to build a renewable energy economy that works for everyone. Join in the streets September 20 and the week after to demand climate justice for all.
• Portland City Hall, Sep 20, 12 pm
• Bowdoin Art Museum steps, Brunswick, Sep 29, 10 am
• Meetinghouse gazebo, Farmington, Sep 20, 12 pm
• Longley Square Park, Norway, Sep 20, 4:30 pm
• Sidewalk at Main and Temple St, Waterville, Sep 20, 4 pm
• Front of Bangor High School, Sep 20, 11 am
• Resistance Corner, Downtown Belfast, Sep 20, 12 pm
• Bar Harbor Village Green, Sep 20, 12 pm
• Dike on Route 1, Machias, Sep 20, 1:30 pm




Global Climate Strike, Sep 20
Event - Posted - Friday, September 13, 2019 

Take to the streets for the Global Climate Strike to make sure elected officials and candidates for office in 2020 hear us loud and clear. Strikes in Maine at Farmington and Bar Harbor, September 20. ~ 350 Action
Bryant Pond 4-H Camp and Learning Center, Sep 20
Event - Posted - Friday, September 13, 2019 

Ron and Deidre Fournier will speak about the Bryant Pond 4-H Camp and Learning Center. At meeting of the Oxford County Educators Association-Retired, Universalist Church, West Paris, September 20, 1 pm.
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News Items
Multiple climber and hiker incidents in the White Mountains Sunday
Associated Press - Monday, September 16, 2019 

A 20-year-old rock climber fell about 50 feet in the Franconia Notch area and suffered life-threatening injuries Sunday. The climber was unconscious and stuck on a ledge halfway up the cliff. A National Guard helicopter took the man to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center for treatment. Not far from the 4,080-foot summit of Cannon Mountain, another hiker, Christopher Cocaine, 63, fell about 20 feet off the Kinsman Trail on Sunday night. He was taken to a hospital for evaluation. In a third case on Sunday night, a man hiking Mt. Osceola near Conway sent a text message to friends that he was off his intended route and had very little food or water. The 23-year-old hiker, Alexander Scates, was given water by passing hikers but later said he had no light source. A conservation officer reached him late Sunday. He was uninjured.
Fox that attacked Appleton men showed signs of rabies
Bangor Daily News - Monday, September 16, 2019 

An Appleton man shot a gray fox to death after the animal attacked him in his yard around noon Sunday. Maine state authorities are testing the fox to determine if it was rabid, and even though the results were not available Monday, Heidi Blood, the animal control officer for the town, said she had a “sneaky suspicion” that the test will come back positive.
Who owns (the most land in) Maine?
Maine Environmental News - Monday, September 16, 2019 

According to the latest Land Report, 5 of the 11 largest landowners in America own a lot of property in Maine. Here is their ranking and total acreage in the U.S.:
1. John Malone, 2.2 million acres
2. Ted Turner, 1.92 million acres
6. Irving Family, 1.25 million acres
9. Peter Buck, 930,000 acres
11. Pingree Heirs, 830,000 acres
Most teens say they’re frightened by climate change; 1 in 4 have taken action
Washington Post - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Across the country, teens are channeling their anxieties about climate change into activism. “Fear,” says 16-year-old Madeline Graham, an organizer of a student protest planned for this week, “is a commodity we don’t have time for if we’re going to win the fight.” A solid majority of American teenagers are convinced that humans are changing the Earth’s climate and believe that it will harm them personally and other members of their generation, according to a new poll. This week, in the run-up to a major United Nations summit, hundreds of thousands of school kids plan to abandon their classrooms to demand more aggressive measures to protect the planet.
One cleanup effort at a time, the Maine woods are getting cleaner
Bangor Daily News - Monday, September 16, 2019 

On Sunday, the state’s game wardens and forest rangers teamed up to stage the sixth annual Landowner Appreciation Cleanup Day, and volunteers across the state pitched in to help clean up sites where trash has been left in the woods. The goal: Let landowners know that outdoors enthusiasts are willing to help solve the problem of woodland dumping, and that they appreciate the access to land that they do not own themselves.
How the Lake Association of Norway Conservation Program Protects Natural Ecosystems in Maine
Other - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Reichen Kuhl is a member of the Lake Association of Norway (LAON), which works to protect freshwater bodies in Maine such as Lake Pennesseewassee where his summer home is located. The Lake Association of Norway runs off volunteer support and help from members like Reichen Kuhl whose mission it is to protect the freshwater lakes of Maine. By keeping up the waters and fighting off invasive species, LAON ensures the lakes maintain their natural beauty and function while maintaining the economic value of the area. In this way, residents strengthen both the natural ecosystems native to Maine lakes and the communities set up around them.
Maine gets $2 million for wetland conservtion
Maine Environmental News - Monday, September 16, 2019 

The Migratory Bird Conservation Commission has approved $2 million in funding for a pair of wetland conservation projects in Maine. One project in eastern Maine will protect 18,739 acres of undeveloped wetlands, river and stream corridors, lake and pond frontage, and surrounding upland buffers in the Narraguagus River watershed. A second project will protect 11,148 acres of undeveloped wetlands, river and stream corridors, saltwater coastline, and surrounding upland buffers in the Kennebec River Estuary. Each project will receive $1 million.
Maine ag chief endorses national climate policy
Mainebiz - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry Commissioner Amanda Beal endorsed a national policy that encourages climate-smart agriculture programs and initiatives at the federal level and confirms the necessity of adapting to protect the country’s natural resources, while building resilient agricultural and food supply chains. Beal was among state agriculture department heads from throughout the U.S. who adopted the new climate policy during last week’s annual meeting of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. The frequency of extreme precipitation events in Maine has increased, increasing risk of soil erosion, seed loss, soil saturation, flooding and nutrient runoff, and resulting in loss of field-work days.
Scientists See A Hotter, Wetter, Less Snowy Future For Maine
Maine Public - Monday, September 16, 2019 

All this week, Maine Public - and more than 250 other news outlets all around the world - are reporting stories on climate change as part of the "Covering Climate Now" project. In Maine, scientists say that climate change means hot summers, warm winters, more rain, and less snow, along with a warming gulf of Maine, and that will affect the state's fisheries, its economy and traditional ways of life. Professor Ivan Fernandez of the Climate Change Institute at UMaine is one of the authors of the report, "Maine's Climate Future." He says that since the findings came out out in 2015, there have been many big changes in the state and globally, including an acceleration in the pace of change.
Democratic Presidential Candidates Focus On Climate Change On The Campaign Trail
Maine Public - Monday, September 16, 2019 

In August, a poll showed a sharp increase in the number of Americans who view climate change as a major threat to the well-being of the country ⁠— from 40% in 2013 to 57% now. It is of particular concern to Democratic voters, as reflected by the emergence of climate change as a leading issue in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary. The same poll indicates that of the voters who identify as Democrats or left-leaning independents, 87% view climate change as a major concern. And that view is reflected by many of the top Democratic presidential candidates.
5 facts you need to know about the proposed salmon farm in Belfast
Bangor Daily News - Monday, September 16, 2019 

A proposal to build a $500-million land-based salmon farm here has drawn both broad support and loud opposition from the community, which largely remains divided over the project’s potential to spur economic growth versus the environmental harm it poses to Penobscot Bay and the surrounding area. Norway-based Nordic Aquafarms has filed thousands of pages of legal documents and permit applications with local planners and officials that aim to address some of these concerns. Here is a brief primer for those who want to learn more about the project.
How one man’s laziness is saving the environment around Pushaw Lake
Bangor Metro - Monday, September 16, 2019 

My laziness has paid off. My yard became the first certified LakeSmart property on Pushaw Lake. Maine passed a shoreland zoning law in 1971 aimed at the prevention of erosion. It worked. Degradation of water quality slowed. Some lakes improved. Unfortunately, many lakeside cottages in Maine were built before the law, sometimes within inches of the waterline, and crowded together. Drainage on camp roads often directs runoff toward the lake. Fertilized lawns have grown more popular. Water quality remains a constant worry. LakeSmart is a modern way to address the problem. The free program informs homeowners on how to maximize enjoyment of their properties, while minimizing erosion. Since moving in nearly 20 years ago, I have seldom done anything to discourage regrowth along my shoreline. It was too much like work. I never thought that I would be an environmental hero. But thanks to my innate laziness, I’m crushing it! ~ Bob Duchesne
The 179th Farmington Fair has begun
Franklin Journal - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Whether competing in events or getting to know the animals, kids at the Farmington Fair were all smiles.
Portland police investigate possible theft at recycler ecomaine
Portland Press Herald - Monday, September 16, 2019 

A top manager at ecomaine’s Portland recycling facility was fired in March for destroying documents, and police are now investigating the theft of more than $300,000 from the publicly owned nonprofit. John Morin was fired from his position as plant manager on March 8 for “unexplained irregularities” at the facility and failing to follow procedures and policies. Meanwhile, Morin is named in a search warrant affidavit that says Portland police are investigating a suspected theft from ecomaine of an estimated $309,000 over a number of years.
Portland hopes to get a better handle on West End air quality concerns
Portland Press Herald - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Portland announced Friday it will partner with the Maine Department of Environmental Protection to install an air quality monitoring device in the West End. The sensor will monitor air quality 24 hours a day and will capture the same data as the monitors that are located on the other side of the Fore River in South Portland, where residents have expressed concerns about air pollution emitted by tank farms. Portland hopes to combine its data with South Portland in an effort to mount a regional effort that could help identify the source of any potential air quality contamination.
Property owners push back against landmark designation
Portland Press Herald - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Several property owners along Forest Avenue and within Woodfords Corner are pushing back against the city of Portland’s efforts to designate their buildings as historic landmarks. City officials and preservationists say the designations between Interstate 295 and Woodfords Corner are needed to preserve the remnants of what was once the city’s “auto row,” where some of the first auto dealerships and showrooms were located, and could free up historic tax credits for renovations. But several property owners say they’re not interested in participating in that program, which will only add a layer of bureaucracy and increase costs for maintenance and restrict the types of upgrades that can be made to buildings.
Maine finally addressing climate change in the gulf
Portland Press Herald - Monday, September 16, 2019 

The Gulf of Maine is the second fastest-warming part of the entire world ocean, a side effect of climate change and the Arctic meltdown, with dramatic implications for life on the Maine coast. As the crisis has unfolded, Maine’s government has avoided taking action that would help the state understand and prepare for the impacts, including ocean acidification, a potentially catastrophic threat to Maine’s marine harvesters. That has changed suddenly with the end of the eight-year administration of Gov. Paul LePage, who dismissed the scientific evidence that human activity is driving climate change, and the Democratic takeover of the Blaine House and both chambers of the state Legislature this past January.
Column: Closing up camp bittersweet
Morning Sentinel - Monday, September 16, 2019 

The last two weeks at camp, we slowly pack up the things we know we won’t need — hot weather clothes, food from the fridge and cupboards, cleaning fluids we know will freeze over the winter, a radio, magazines, books, a food processor I ferry between home and camp each year. It is a sad process, having to close up camp, but as the nights get cold, we know it is time to go. At some point, I realize it is not just leaving that makes me sad, but having to say goodbye to summer, too. ~ Amy Calder
Letter: Extend rail service to prevent Portland congestion
Portland Press Herald - Monday, September 16, 2019 

The number of cars and trucks filing into Portland each day in unprecedented numbers is not only going to grow by the month, but also will bring to light heightened issues of parking inadequacies. am excited about the growth that Portland is experiencing, but we need to look at long-term solutions to the challenges created by this growth. The rail line study between Portland and Westbrook, which Patricia Quinn of the Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority cited as a “conversation starter,” may very well be the best first solution to dealing with a crisis that’s not going away. ~ Edward McKersie, Portland
Letter: Lobsters before whales
Bangor Daily News - Monday, September 16, 2019 

Can you believe this? They want to have the lobstermen cut way down on the rope they are using to tie the traps together to save the right whale. My good Mainers and wonderful visitors, which would you like to have: a whale feed or a lobster feed? I guess I know the answer to that. If this rule is applied, I don’t think the lobstermen will be able to keep up with demand. These lobstermen work hard, and I think lobsters are much more important than right whales. ~ Dwight C. Whitney, Sr., Jonesboro
Summer of Blob: Maine sees more big, stinging jellyfish
Associated Press - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

The Gulf of Maine and some of its beaches, ever popular with tourists, have recorded a high number of sightings of a big jellyfish that has the ability to sting swimmers and occasionally does. The lion’s mane jellyfish, the largest known variety, can grow to 5 or more feet across, with tentacles more than 100 feet long. Such giant jellyfish are uncommon, but beachgoers say larger than average ones have been exceptionally plentiful this year in the gulf.
Monmouth dairy uses federal, local grants to go solar
Kennebec Journal - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

In 15 years, The Milkhouse in Monmouth will no longer have energy payments. The dairy farm recently installed 192 solar panels on the roof of a winter cow-housing barn, which will be online in the next couple of weeks, according to Caitlin Frame, who owns The Milkhouse with her partner, Andy Smith. The solar array, installed by Insource Renewables of Pittsfield, is a 72-kilowatt, roof-mounted system. “We estimated it would save us about $10,000 a year and generate around 70,000 kilowats hours annually, which will replace all of the energy needs of our business,” Frame said.
2050 The Fight for Earth
TIME - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

Man-made climate change has thrown us headfirst into a true crisis that touches every part of the globe, and we can’t waste any time making systemic changes to the global economy, geopolitics, and culture if we want life on Earth to survive. Thirty years from now, we’ll look back at 2019 as another inflection point—whether good or bad is up to us.
1,000 salmon escaped a farm near the Canada-U.S. border
Associated Press - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

A salmon farming group is defending its effort to be transparent with the public about the problem of escaped fish in the wake of an incident in which hundreds of fish got loose near the border of Maine and New Brunswick. Cooke Aquaculture has said an equipment malfunction in August resulted in about 1,000 fish being released by Kelly Cove Salmon Ltd., one of its divisions. The incident stoked criticism from environmental groups that say escaped salmon jeopardize the vulnerable wild Atlantic salmon population.
Colorful trails to enjoy this fall foliage season in Maine
Bangor Daily News - Sunday, September 15, 2019 

Each September and October, the trees of Maine put on a grand show, their leaves bursting into fiery colors. Here are a few trails and trail networks that I find to be exceptionally colorful in the fall.
• Viles Arboretum in Augusta
• Bald Bluff Mountain in Amherst
• Sargent Mountain in Acadia National Park
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