May 23, 2018  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Drowning with Others, May 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

John Anderson, Professor of Ecology/Natural History at College of the Atlantic, argues for developing a broad coalition to help conserve Maine’s seabird islands from sea level rise. At Wells Reserve at Lajudholm, May 30, 6 pm.
Invasive fish, May 30
Event - Posted - Wednesday, May 23, 2018 

George Smith will discuss the impact invasive fish are having on Maine’s native fish. At Mount Vernon Community Center, May 30, 7 pm. Sponsored by 30 Mile Watershed Association.
Maine Environmental News
Announcement - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. MEN is the most comprehensive online source available for links conservation and natural resource news and events in Maine (and a bit beyond). We have posted summaries and links to over 50,000 news articles and announcements. We also post breaking stories and exclusives. Be sure to check not only today's news, but take a look at the headlines from the past several days as well. Articles often come to our attention a few days after they are published. Follow us on Twitter @MaineEnviroNews. ~ Jym St. Pierre, Editor
Join the fight for Maine's clean energy future
Action Alert - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

In Maine, we are seeing the damaging effects of climate change firsthand: tick borne illnesses like Lyme disease are on the rise, the warming Gulf of Maine threatens our marine economy, air pollution drives up asthma rates for kids and adults, and extreme weather impacts our outdoor recreation and farming industries. The technology to turn off dirty fossil fuels already exists. What is standing in the way of our clean energy future? Politicians who are bought and paid for by the oil and gas industry. ~ Maine Conservation Voters
Defining Wilderness: Defining Maine, May 29 - Jul 24
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

The Maine State Library is offering a free reading and discussion group with copies of books available through the library. The series, Defining Wilderness: Defining Maine, runs for 5 sessions, May 29 - July 24, at the State Library in Augusta. Books to be discussed include "The Maine Woods" by Henry David Thoreau.
Bats, May 29
Event - Posted - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

Biologist Trevor Peterson will speak about local species of bats. At Topsham Public Library, May 29, 6 pm. Sponsored by Cathance River Education Alliance.
“Living within Limits” Teen Environmental Poster Contest
Announcement - Tuesday, May 22, 2018 

The Teen Library Council of the Patten Library in Bath and Brunswick-based Manomet are sponsoring an environmental poster contest for middle and high school students. Posters should promote actions that help sustain the planet and reduce our environmental footprint. Deadline: June 1.
Sign-Up to Count Fish at Nequasset
Announcement - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The annual alewife count at the Nequasset Fish Ladder in Woolwich is happening. Join the fun by signing up to count during any two 10 minute blocks within a two hour period.
Wilderness Under Siege, May 30
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Nationally known author and explorer George Wuerthner will discuss the challenges facing Wilderness, how people can better protect the Wildernesses in their backyards and around the country, and organizing against efforts to weaken or repeal the Wilderness Act. At Curtis Library, Brunswick, May 30, 6:30 pm.
Field Trip: Capt. Fitzgerald Preserve and Bay Bridge, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Explore two town-owned properties in Brunswick for breeding and migrant birds: Fitzgerald Preserve and Bay Bridge Wetland Park on the Androscoggin River. May 27, 6:30 – 11 am. Sponsored by Merrymeeting Audubon.
White Mountains Centennial exhibition, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The Museums of the Bethel Historical Society host a preview reception of the new displays, “White Mountain National Forest: A Centennial Exhibition” and “The White Mountains: Alps of New England.” At Robinson House, Bethel, May 27, 2-5 pm.
Farmer Talent Show & Open Mic, May 27
Event - Posted - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

The first annual Farmer Talent Show & Open Mic will benefit the Market’s Harvest Bucks program, which increases access to fruit and vegetables for low-income households. At East Madison Grange, May 27, 5-8 pm.
Walk on the Wild Side, May 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 19, 2018 

Turner Public Library’s summer programming begins with a nature walk. At Androscoggin Riverlands State Park, May 26, 2 pm.
Edible (and Poisonous) Plants, May 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 19, 2018 

Tom Seymour, author, botanist and edible plant enthusiast, will introduce you to many of the edible and medicinal plants that can be found in Maine’s woods and fields. At Head of Tide Preserve, Belfast, May 26, 10 am - noon.
Birding Extravaganza, May 26
Event - Posted - Saturday, May 19, 2018 

Ted Allen from Merrymeeting Audubon will lead birders through the Kennebec Estuary Land Trust’s Thorne Head Preserve in Bath, May 26, 8 am.
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News Items
Trump Administration Joins Fossil Fuel Companies in Climate Fight Against Cities
Inside Climate News - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Just before a critical hearing to determine the fate of a pair of climate lawsuits, the United States government has weighed in as a heavyweight ally on the side of the fossil fuel companies. Lawyers from the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division filed a friend of the court brief last week in support of five of the world's largest oil and gas companies, which are seeking to have lawsuits dismissed. Pat Parenteau, a professor of environmental law at the Vermont Law School, said, "What the government is trying to do is get the judge to take his eye off the ball. The question [in these cases] is not about policy, but about the industry's conduct."
These State Parks Have All the Beauty of National Parks — and None of the Crowds
Other - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Travel+Leisure - Every year from Maine to Alaska, throngs pour into U.S. national parks and preserves to climb towering cliffs, hike through misty forests and capture the perfect selfie at the grandest of canyons. But travelers who want to revel in natural splendor without entering the scrum have an alternative: these state parks [including Baxter State Park] deserve spots on your travel to-do list.
Help wanted at Maine's parks and historic sites
Mainebiz - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Maine's labor shortage is affecting the state's parks and visitor sites. The state Bureau of Parks and Lands, which manages 48 parks and historic sites, wants to fill the following jobs: park ranger, assistant park ranger, customer representative assistant, lifeguard, lifeguard supervisor and laborer. Most are seasonal positions. Love of the outdoors might mitigate the pay rate, which is some cases is a notch above the state's minimum wage of $10.10 an hour.
L.L.Bean and Maine Audubon to Host David Allen Sibley at Birding Festival
Other - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Outdoor retailer L.L.Bean is partnering with Maine Audubon this weekend to host their fourth annual Birding Festival, May 25-27. The event will feature educational presentations on birds and bats, as well as guided birding walks in diverse ecosystems from Freeport to Mohegan Island. The featured speaker will be David Allen Sibley, author of The Sibley Guide to Birds, the fastest selling bird book in history, used by millions of birders from novices to experts.
New Tick-Borne Illness In Maine Causes Allergic Reaction To Red Meat
Maine Public - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Dog and deer ticks are well-established in Maine and cause an a number of illnesses. Now, another species — the lone star tick, typically found in the southern U.S. — appears to be making inroads here, and it brings with it a surprise: an anaphylactic reaction to eating meat from hoofed animals.
Independent Candidates Gather At State House
Maine Public - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Independent candidates for governor, Congress and the Legislature were at the State House in Augusta Monday to compare notes on running as independents. Several candidates pointed out that while they are all unenrolled, they don’t all agree on issues. Not all have filed petitions to get on the ballot yet, but if they are successful in collecting signatures, there could be more than 20 independent candidates after the filing deadline June 1.
Don’t be fooled by these pretty invasive flowers that are bad for Maine
Bangor Daily News - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Yellow iris, ornamental jewelweed and black swallow-wort may be pretty, but they can smother the state’s native flora and provide less-nutritious food for native fauna, according to Tori Jackson, a University of Maine Cooperative Extension associate professor. According to Nancy Olmstead, invasive plant biologist for the Maine Natural Areas Program, home gardeners need to be both vigilant and tenacious to combat these plants.
Brewer Riverwalk to extend to almost a mile by October
Bangor Daily News - Monday, May 21, 2018 

The Brewer Riverwalk along the Penobscot River is slated to double in length this summer, stretching almost an additional half-mile from the Joshua Chamberlain Bridge up to Veteran’s Park. The idea for a riverwalk trail was conceived of by residents and city officials in 2000 as part of a downtown revitalization plan, which included the idea to build a walking and biking trail that runs the length of Brewer’s waterfront. Hopefully one day, Community and Economic Development Director D’Arcy Main-Boyington said, residents will have access to a “more primitive dirt trail” connected to the Riverwalk that encircles the city, through woods and land owned by the Brewer Land Trust.
LePage selects 32 neighborhoods for investment boost
Portland Press Herald - Monday, May 21, 2018 

More than 30 Maine neighborhoods, including some wealthier areas, could reap benefits from a new federal program to encourage private investment in poor parts of the country. Opportunity zones selected by Gov. Paul LePage and approved by U.S. Treasury Friday include distressed paper mill towns like Madison and Millinocket and former military bases in Brunswick and Limestone, but also comparatively better-off parts of downtown Portland, South Portland and Saco.
UNE launches new institute for study of the North Atlantic and Arctic regions
Portland Press Herald - Monday, May 21, 2018 

The University of New England on Monday launched a new institute dedicated to education and research in the North Atlantic and Arctic regions. The Institute for North Atlantic Studies of the University of New England, referred to as UNE North, will be based in Portland, officials said. U.S. Sen. Angus King said the institute “further establish(es) our state as a leader in the Arctic region.”
Fourth LL Bean customer sues over return policy change
Bangor Daily News - Monday, May 21, 2018 

A California man has become the fourth L.L.Bean customer to sue the outdoor retailer over the change in its return policy earlier this year, claiming it has harmed him. L.L. Bean spokeswoman Carolyn Beem said the newest lawsuit is by the same group of lawyers handling the other three suits. “Like the other three suits, this one is meritless,” she said.
Environmentalists: Paper mills likely major source of chemical pollution in waterways
E&E/Greenwire - Monday, May 21, 2018 

A number of U.S. paper mills are expected to discharge hundreds of pounds of a controversial chemical, perfluorinated alkyl substances, into rivers — a reality that the federal government is aware of and has signed off on, according to internal Federal Drug Administration (FDA) documents. The chemical has been linked to thyroid disease and testicular cancer. Environmentalists worry that FDA records show that pollution in water from paper mills is unchecked.
Things to Do in Boothbay Harbor
Yankee Magazine - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Just an hour’s drive north of Portland lies the village of Boothbay Harbor, Maine — a seaside getaway embodying the quintessential midcoast. Its shoreline, fringed with evergreen forests and rocky outcroppings, is an idyllic setting for any weekend escape, and its downtown, filled with a variety of attractive shops and restaurants, ensures that the whole family will enjoy the trip.
The Marginal Way | A Coastal Stroll in Ogunquit
Yankee Magazine - Monday, May 21, 2018 

With its ocean views, plentiful benches, and nearby downtown Ogunquit, the Marginal Way in Maine is one of New England's most beloved scenic coastal walks.
Maine lobster industry fears retaliation if China seafood tariff is enacted
Portland Press Herald - Monday, May 21, 2018 

Maine lobster dealers are among a group of U.S. seafood exporters asking federal authorities to keep its industry out of the brewing U.S-China trade war, arguing that putting a tariff on Chinese seafood would likely result in painful retaliation against U.S. exports. Such retaliation would hurt Alaskan fishermen and Maine lobstermen most, industry leaders say. In 2017, U.S. lobster exports to China were worth more than $90.2 million and rising. That’s 125 times bigger than it was just a decade earlier.
Letter: Project would only line CMP’s pockets
Portland Press Herald - Monday, May 21, 2018 

CMP’s transmission line would have a massive impact on our natural resources while providing little benefit to Mainers since all of the electricity will be sent to Massachusetts. The proposed route would tarnish 53 miles of undisturbed land in Maine, cross the Kennebec River Gorge, the Appalachian Trail and 115 streams, and affect 263 different wetlands. Energy regulators in New Hampshire already rejected a similar transmission line proposal, commonly known as Northern Pass, over concerns. ~ Dwight Ely, Scarborough
110 years ago first gift for what would become Acadia National Park made by Eliza Homans
Acadia On My Mind Blog - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Many people know that Acadia National Park celebrated its centennial in 2016, but few realize that it was 110 years ago this month that Eliza Homans of Boston provided a stunning donation of land that helped launch the creation of the park.
Poland Spring Resort’s Robbins named to Maine Tourism Association Hall of Fame
Turner Publishing - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Cyndi Sievert Robbins of Poland Spring Resort in Poland was named the Maine Tourism Association 2018 inductee into the association’s Hall of Fame. MTA’s Hall of Fame was created to recognize outstanding individuals who, through leadership, dedication and professionalism, have made significant and sustained contributions to the tourism industry in Maine.
What type of tree would you like to be?
Turner Publishing - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

I was intrigued recently when I saw that a local newspaper had asked their readers, “If you could be a tree, what type of a tree wouldyou be?” This prompted me to ask the followers of our Facebook page what type of tree they would be, and why. People gave some interesting answers, and no two were the same.
Aquarium Draws Crowd In Recognition Of National Endangered Species Day
Other - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Falmouth (MA) Enterprise - There is no one reason that the “very precious wild Atlantic salmon” is disappearing from the rivers in Maine, an information booklet on the subject states; rather, there are many reasons the species is now in danger of becoming extinct, such as dams, pollution, water temperature and over-fishing. Information on Atlantic salmon, North Atlantic right whales, and sea turtles, three endangered species found off the coast of New England, was available to the steady stream of visitors who attended an event at the Woods Hole Science Aquarium in recognition of National Endangered Species Day. Hundreds of people filled the aquarium event room on Saturday, May 19.
Maine Wants To Return Salmon, Herring To Historic Habitat
Associated Press - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

A Maine state project aims to bring salmon and river herring back to a tributary of one of the state's major rivers. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is using its Species Recovery Grants to States Program to award more than $310,000 to the Maine Department of Marine Resources for the project. The state wants to restore salmon and herring back to Togus Stream, a tributary of the Kennebec River. The state says the river was once home to the fish, but the construction of barriers has blocked them from their historical habitat for more than two centuries. The stream has the potential to support runs of more than 300,000 river herring into Togus Pond every year.
Why everyone in one Maine town is staring at the water
Lincoln County News - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Thousands of small fish are making their annual voyage through the Damariscotta Mills fish ladder, risking sea gulls and fishermen on the climb to Damariscotta Lake, where they will spawn. The fish can choose two paths. One leads to a waterfall, the other up the fish ladder to the lake. The fish, which normally live in saltwater, migrate to the freshwater lake to spawn. The fish that get caught in the waterfall area are the ones that are harvested.
You Can Help Turn the Tide on Plastic
National Geographic - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Six Things You Can Do (and Feel No Pain)
1. Give up plastic bags
2. Skip straws
3. Pass up plastic bottles
4. Avoid plastic packaging
5. Recycle what you can
6. Don’t litter
We Know Plastic Is Harming Marine Life. What About Us?
National Geographic - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

There often are tiny bits of plastic in the fish and shellfish we eat. Scientists are racing to figure out what that means for our health.
For Animals, Plastic Is Turning the Ocean Into a Minefield
National Geographic - Sunday, May 20, 2018 

Some 700 species of marine animals have been reported—so far—to have eaten or become entangled in plastic. We don’t fully understand plastic’s long-term impact on wildlife (nor its impact on us). We haven’t been using the stuff for very long. The first documented cases of seabirds ingesting plastic were 74 Laysan albatross chicks found on a Pacific atoll in 1966, when plastic production was roughly a twentieth of what it is today. In hindsight, those birds seem like the proverbial canaries in a coal mine.
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