August 19, 2018  
Announcements               
Press releases, events, publications released, etc. from Maine environmental organizations and agencies. Submit content.

Friends of Baxter State Park benefit, July 31
Event - Posted - Tuesday, July 24, 2018 

Join Friends of Baxter State Park for a benefit night. Flatbread Company will donate a portion of all receipts from the evening to Friends. At Portland, July 31, 5-9 pm.
Pasture walks, Jul 30 - Sep 9
Event - Posted - Monday, July 23, 2018 

The Maine Grass Farmers Network is hosting free pasture walks this summer on July 30, August 8, and September 9.
NRCM's People’s Choice Award
Announcement - Monday, July 23, 2018 

Nominate someone who volunteers their time to protect Maine’s air, land, water, or wildlife. Deadline for the Natural Resources Council of Maine’s 13th annual People’s Choice Award is August 3.
Tour Maine Rice Paddies, Jul 30
Event - Posted - Monday, July 23, 2018 

At Wild Folk Farm, Benton, grows rice as well as ducks and azolla in the rice paddies. July 30, 6 pm.
Muddy River Evening Paddle, Jul 30
Event - Posted - Monday, July 23, 2018 

the Muddy is shortest of six tributaries draining into Merrymeeting Bay. Join Friends of Merrymeeting Bay on July 30, 6 pm, for an evening paddle or row on the Muddy River in Topsham. Rescheduled from July 17.
Protect the Endangered Species Act from Republican attacks
Action Alert - Saturday, July 21, 2018 

The Endangered Species Act itself is now as threatened as the wildlife that it's meant to protect. Republicans in Congress and the fossil fuel industry recently proposed new legislation to severely weaken the decades-old law that has saved dozens of endangered species and helped the recovery of hundreds more. What's more, the Trump administration just announced its own plans to roll back protections in the ESA to make it easier to de-list species. Sign the petition. ~ CREDO Action
Maine Seaweed Fair, Jul 28
Event - Posted - Saturday, July 21, 2018 

The Maine Seaweed Fair celebrates Maine's marine heritage through the incredible world of seaweeds. It includes vendors, speakers, activities, art and demonstrations. At Snow Marine Park, Rockland, July 28, from 10 am - 5 pm.
Current  Archive      Page: 1 2 3 4


 
People Online People Online:
Visitors Visitors: 96
Members Members: 0
Total Total: 96


Visitors since 2/7/12 Minimize

   You are here:  Home    
We Need You! Minimize
Thanks for visiting Maine Environmental News, 
a service of RESTORE: The North Woods. 
This is the most comprehensive online source 
available for links to Maine conservation and 
natural resource news stories and events. 
If eveyone who visits this website donates 
$25 (or more) a year we can 
keep this service going.

Donate Button with Credit Cards

 Jym St. Pierre, Editor 
Maine Environmental News is provided 
as a service of RESTORE: The North Woods

News Items
Quick action by Rockport man saves lobsterman
Courier-Gazette - Saturday, August 18, 2018 

A Rockland lobsterman said he thought he was going to die as he struggled Thursday to stay above water in Rockland Harbor. He was at the bow when another boat came speeding by at a fast rate, despite it being a no-wake zone. The wave created by the speeding boat caused him to lose his balance and fall into the water. Kenney was wearing heavy clothing including boots which caused him to sink under the surface. But the quick response by Andrew Banow, a crew member of a fishing vessel docked at the Rockland Fish Pier, prevented a tragedy.
Bicyclist injured in Saco hit and run
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, August 18, 2018 

A bicyclist was injured after being struck by a red pick up truck which did not stop Friday on Jenkins road in Saco. Saco Police said in a statement that a half hour later a red pick up truck was also involved in a three vehicle crash on Buxton Road. Police declined to say whether the same red pick up truck was involved in both incidents.
Letter: Is Portland planning with the Earth in mind?
Portland Press Herald - Saturday, August 18, 2018 

Portland’s built environment is rapidly changing. Every time I see a new building rising from a once-empty lot, I consider how it fits into its immediate context and wonder what it will look like 50 years from now – or even 100 years from now. Is the city of Portland planning with the health of Mother Earth in mind or just building for short-term profit? If Portland’s leadership is wise, not only ought each building be a thoughtful investment in the future health of the planet – but it ought to have appealing aesthetics, be appropriate to its context and contribute to an overall city design that promotes long-term livability, adaptability and sustainability. ~ Francesca Galluccio-Steele, Portland
Despite fishery shutdown, there is still not much shrimp out there, scientists conclude
Associated Press - Friday, August 17, 2018 

The Maine-based shrimp fishery has been shut down since 2013 because of concerns such as warming ocean temperatures and poor survival of young. Scientists working with the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission are assessing the shrimp stock, and so far it looks like little has changed. Results of the stock assessment “look fairly similar to what we’ve seen in previous years,” said Megan Ware, a fishery management plan coordinator with the Atlantic States. That means reopening the fishery anytime soon could be a tough sell when regulators meet to discuss and vote on the subject this fall.
Maine sea urchin harvesting rules to remain mostly unchanged
Associated Press - Friday, August 17, 2018 

The Maine Department of Marine Resources Advisory Council met Tuesday to set terms for the urchin fishing season, which runs September to March. The council decided to allow fishermen on the western coast to fish up to 15 days and fishermen in the eastern to fish up to 38. Those are the same specifications as the previous season. The urchins are harvested so their roe can be used in food.
Brunswick police rescue capsized canoeists in Thomas Bay
Portland Press Herald - Friday, August 17, 2018 

Brunswick police officers helped rescue four people from Thomas Bay early Friday morning after the canoes they were riding in capsized. Residents of Johnson’s Way called 911 to report hearing people yelling for help in Thomas Bay. When first responders arrived, officers commandeered a rowboat and headed out into the bay, where they pulled two men from the water between Thomas Point and Howard Point. A woman was able to swim to shore, while another woman was rescued by a tourist from Virginia who was in the area, police said. Dean Ouellette, 44, and Andrew Ross, 35, both of Brunswick; Rebecca Hollingshead, 35, of Harpswell, and 33-year-old Michelle Westbrook of Miami had capsized the two canoes they had tied together.
Letter: Cooperative federal effort needed to combat climate change
Portland Press Herald - Friday, August 17, 2018 

Thank you for publishing the Aug. 12 Center for Public Integrity article on the public health risk of the increased tick population, which links it to climate change and calls out state government for neglecting to address the issue in a comprehensive and timely manner. It is the role of the free press to hold government accountable, and you have done it admirably. However, this problem is too big to be solved by states alone. We need strong federal action as well. Climate change is the single most important issue of our time, and we are fast approaching the point of no return. ~ Sarah Braik, Portland Chapter, Citizens’ Climate Lobby
America's Crown Jewel; Greenville Looks to the Lake
Maine Public - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Renowned naturalist and writer, Henry David Thoreau, who hiked and paddled his way through the Maine woods, described Moosehead Lake as "a gleaming silver platter." But the residents of Greenville have a different vision: "America's Crown Jewel.
Belfast fish farm opponents blast zoning changes
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

In April, Belfast city councilors unanimously approved zoning ordinance changes that would allow a company planning one of the world’s largest indoor salmon farms to advance to the next stages of the project. Earlier this summer, two Belfast residents filed a lawsuit alleging that the city did not follow its own process when it gave the greenlight to the zoning changes. More than 150 people squeezed into the Troy Howard Middle School cafeteria Wednesday night to share their thoughts before the Belfast Planning Board during a public hearing on the issue. Opponents of the fish farm feel city officials acted hastily and without transparency in approving the zoning change, and fear what the project might mean to the local environment.
Franklin County group mum on request to CMP for benefits
Morning Sentinel - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

A group of elected officials in Franklin County has asked Central Maine Power for benefits as compensation for a proposed Canada to Massachusetts powerline project that will cut through the county, but are not saying what exactly they have asked for. “I don’t negotiate in the press,” said Sen. Tom Saviello, R-Wilton, when asked for details of the request submitted to CMP about two weeks ago. The Morning Sentinel has submitted a public records request for the information. In Somerset County, CMP also signed a separate memorandum of understanding with a conservation group for $22 million in mitigation payments that would help boost tourism and recreation.
Maine’s highest court rejects appeal of PUC changes to solar energy incentives
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

The Maine Supreme Judicial Court has dismissed a legal challenge to a controversial new solar energy rule, saying the dispute should go to a lower court instead. The ruling Thursday is the latest blow for solar advocates who have fought the state Public Utilities Commission over a new rule that reduces the credit that people with home solar panel systems receive on their energy bills. But Sean Mahoney, head of the Conservation Law Foundation in Maine, said the environmental advocacy group will now continue its fight in Superior Court.
Maine Forest Rangers want to know who dumped huge load of trash
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Rangers with the Maine Forest Service are asking for the public’s help in finding the person or persons who dumped a huge load of trash on a wooded, gravel road in Fryeburg this week. Forest rangers said they have some strong leads in solving the case. No arrests had been made as of Thursday evening.
Truck tips over, dumps load of stinky bait fish in Newcastle
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

A box truck carrying 35 barrels of bait fish tipped over on Route 1 in Newcastle on Thursday morning, disrupting traffic and leaving that section of the busy highway covered with smelly fish for more than three hours. Lt. Brendan Kane identified the driver as 41-year-old Christopher Grendell, of Brunswick. Grendel told police he had to enter the breakdown lane to avoid hitting a motor vehicle that had stopped in traffic to make a left hand turn. Grendell was charged with giving false information of a motor vehicle accident.
Woman hit by leaping 5-foot-long sturgeon while boating on the Kennebec
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

John Ware was leading a party boat full of family members down the Kennebec on the Fourth of July when a 5 ½-foot sturgeon leaped out of the water and right into Christine Wallace. Ware and his brother-in-law Gui Demers ultimately lifted the fish out of the boat, which was estimated to weigh 185 pounds. Nobody on the boat sustained any major injuries from the incident. Atlantic sturgeon can grow up to 14 feet and weigh in at 800 pounds. They span from Canada to Florida in rivers and the sea, and are listed as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act. It’s unclear why sturgeon leap into the air.
Pingree Hopeful About Passage Of Land And Water Conservation Fund
Maine Public - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Congress has until the end of September to reauthorize the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) that has helped fund scores of projects in Maine. The measure has the support of all four members of Maine’s delegation, and U.S. Representative Chellie Pingree is hopeful that it will pass. Pingree is concerned, however, about other issues that may dominate what little time Congress will have to finish its work in September. Maine has received over $180 million in LWCF funding over the past fifty years, helping to protect places such as Acadia National Park and the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.
Editorial: A new Lyme vaccine is in the works; let’s not repeat history
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

If it’s easy for ticks to get by unnoticed, and easy to miss the symptoms, why isn’t there a vaccine? It turns out there once was — and there could be again if current efforts go as planned. Given that there’s only one vaccine in the works, it’s important for people to learn from the past.
Opinion: An aquaculture opportunity that doesn’t pollute, but renews our seas
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Maine does have an opportunity to be a global player in aquaculture. Indeed, Maine can harness its natural resources to help feed a hungry and growing world. But the risky and environmentally damaging model being advanced in Belfast and Bucksport is not the way to go. There is an alternative. Green Wave is a Connecticut nonprofit that teaches and promotes a marine aquaculture system that not only doesn’t pollute, it actually renews and regenerates our beleaguered seas. The heart of Green Wave’s system is kelp, but it also produces clams, mussels, scallops and oysters. The Green Wave model is based on kelp planted on long strings running just below the water’s surface and kept afloat and in place by buoys. Mussels are grown on vertical strings hanging from buoys, scallops in vertical pens, and oysters and clams in horizontal pens. ~ Lawrence Reichard, Belfast
Time to help landowners clean up trash of Road Slobs
George Smith BDN Outdoor News Blog - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

It’s more than irritating that every two weeks I can pick up a full garbage bag of trash between my home and my woodlot up the road, plus a second bag of returnables. Road slobs just don’t care that they are trashing our roadsides and private lands. Shame on them! It’s time for you to step up, for one day, and let private landowners know we appreciate access to their property. On September 9, DIFW and the Maine Forest Service, hosts a statewide clean-up day. I do hope you will participate.
Stocking Arctic charr in heritage pond is a bad idea, fish conservationists say
Bangor Daily News - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Fisheries conservationists made passionate pleas Tuesday night for state officials to reconsider a plan that would allow the introduction of Arctic charr into a brook trout water that has never been stocked, and which is included on Maine’s list of protected Heritage Fish Waters. The proposed delisting of Henderson Pond, which is in northern Piscataquis County, due west of Millinocket, drew the ire of those in attendance.
Opinion: State could magnify its allure by removing more dams from its rivers
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Maine could greatly enhance its allure by setting more of its rivers free. As a conservation biologist and as an angler, I have found that to drive around Maine is to notice dam after dam. Maine has more than a thousand dams. But three-quarters of Maine’s hydropower comes from the state’s 24 largest dams, meaning that many of the remainder generate slight amounts of electricity. Hydropower dams are not environmentally clean, as so long touted by the hydro industry. Most notably, hydropower dams block the spawning migrations of important fish such as Atlantic salmon, shad, river herring and sturgeon. The effect of these barriers on fish populations has been devastating. ~ John Waldman, professor of biology at Queens College in New York
Opinion: State could magnify its allure by removing more dams from its rivers
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Maine could greatly enhance its allure by setting more of its rivers free. As a conservation biologist and as an angler, I have found that to drive around Maine is to notice dam after dam. Maine has more than a thousand dams. But three-quarters of Maine’s hydropower comes from the state’s 24 largest dams, meaning that many of the remainder generate slight amounts of electricity. Hydropower dams are not environmentally clean, as so long touted by the hydro industry. Most notably, hydropower dams block the spawning migrations of important fish such as Atlantic salmon, shad, river herring and sturgeon. The effect of these barriers on fish populations has been devastating. ~ John Waldman, professor of biology at Queens College in New York
Opinion: State could magnify its allure by removing more dams from its rivers
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

Maine could greatly enhance its allure by setting more of its rivers free. As a conservation biologist and as an angler, I have found that to drive around Maine is to notice dam after dam. Maine has more than a thousand dams. But three-quarters of Maine’s hydropower comes from the state’s 24 largest dams, meaning that many of the remainder generate slight amounts of electricity. Hydropower dams are not environmentally clean, as so long touted by the hydro industry. Most notably, hydropower dams block the spawning migrations of important fish such as Atlantic salmon, shad, river herring and sturgeon. The effect of these barriers on fish populations has been devastating. ~ John Waldman, professor of biology at Queens College in New York
Letter: Maine delegation shows climate change, air quality are bipartisan issues
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

The Environmental Protection Agency recently rolled back our federal clean car standards – the best plan we have to mitigate climate change from Washington, D.C. Untouched, the standards would increase fuel efficiency and avoid billions of tons of carbon emissions from 2018 to 2026. Unfortunately, the Trump administration is proposing to freeze these standards at the 2020 levels and block states’ ability to set their own emissions standards. Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King and Reps. Bruce Poliquin and Chellie Pingree make me proud to be a native of Maine, because they acted together to advocate for our environment and against standards like these. ~ Madeleine Fenderson, Environment Maine, Portland
Letter: Canadians may have embargoed cool, crisp air
Portland Press Herald - Thursday, August 16, 2018 

We’ve been out of reach of news (real or fake) for a couple of weeks. Did President Trump slap a tariff on “cool, dry, Canadian air”? If not, where is it? ~ Jerry Senger, Scarborough
Column: A budding journalist, reporting for duty
Portland Press Herald - Wednesday, August 15, 2018 

God save the student journalists. Kristen Waite, who grew up in Turner and graduated last year from Hebron Academy, is about to begin her sophomore year at Ithaca College in upstate New York. She’s a double major – journalism and environmental studies. But spend an hour sipping Starbucks coffee with her and you’ll soon detect a passion for the printed word that goes all the way back to middle school. Today, more than 200 newspapers across the nation are responding to a call by The Boston Globe to push back hard with editorials condemning President Trump’s endless attacks on journalists as “enemies of the people” and “dangerous and sick” purveyors of “fake news.” It can’t come soon enough. ~ Bill Nemitz
Current  Archive      Page: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...


Environmental headlines:

LePage wants  to withdraw Maine
from regional air pollution program.

The Trump administration plans to ease
rules for auto emissions and efficiency.

BANGOR DAILY NEWS / DANBY

 

News Feeds

MainePages.com
Copyright © 2009-2018 Maine Environmental News
Terms Of Use Privacy Statement
Home|About|Links|Submit Content|Search|Contact